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Wednesday, May 13, 2020 | History

3 edition of Yields and profitability of conservation tillage in the eastern Palouse found in the catalog.

Yields and profitability of conservation tillage in the eastern Palouse

Yields and profitability of conservation tillage in the eastern Palouse

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Published by Agricultural Research Center, Washington State University in [Pullman, Wash.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Conservation tillage -- Washington (State)

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDouglas L. Young ... [et al.].
    SeriesResearch bulletin / Agricultural Research Center, Washington State University -- XB 0941., Research bulletin (Washington State University. Agricultural Research Center) -- 941.
    ContributionsYoung, Douglas Leonard.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination5 p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14659734M
    OCLC/WorldCa20242939

    Production systems, using conservation tillage, reduced herbicide use, and diversity of crops through rotation, may offer possible solutions. Studies by Young et al. () report that in the Palouse region of Washington there are distinct trade-offs between tillage and herbicide use for wheat and barley. the next one. The hilly Palouse region had been farmed that way for decades. But the tillage was taking a toll on the Palouse, and its famously fertile soil was eroding at an alarming rate. Convinced that there had to be a better way to work the land, Aeschliman decided to experi-ment in with an emerging method known as no-till Size: KB.

    The systems also included two tillage intensities (conservation and conventional)and three weed management levels. Based upon prices and program provisions projected for –95, the conservation tillagelwinter wheat-spring barley-spring pea system at maximum weed management dominated all others in high profitability and had low economic by: Start studying APES Ch Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Search. Browse. phosphates, and potassium applied to the soil to restore fertility and increase crop yields. breaking up the exposed soil, and then smoothing the surface. Compare conservation-tillage .

    parison that is common in economic analysis; yield with conservation versus yield without conservation. A curve with empirically confirmed properties is shown in Figure 1 to relate wheat yield to topsoil depth for a deep uniform soil in the Palouse (Walker and . or soil. The Palouse region of eastern Washington and north-ern Idaho has land uses and agricultural systems that include native prairie remnants, permanent vegetative cover, perennial grass seed production, and contrasting tillage practices such as inversion tillage and NT. Often, in .


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Yields and profitability of conservation tillage in the eastern Palouse Download PDF EPUB FB2

The following is a guest blog contributed by Vicki Carter from the Spokane Conservation District The farm producers of Eastern Washington are fortunate to live in one of the most fertile and productive farming regions in the world; the Palouse. Agriculture is a $ billion industry in Washington State and the rolling hills of the Palouse [ ].

Conservation on the Palouse. The following is a guest blog contributed by Vicki Carter from the Spokane Conservation District. The farm producers of Eastern Washington are fortunate to live in one of the most fertile and productive farming regions in the world; the Palouse. This is an important and disturbing book, both for the environmental degradation it documents and the message of what little progress our agricultural practices on the Palouse have made.

In a sense, the precursor of Plowed Under was a series Washington State Magazine:: Connecting you to Washington State University -- the state -- the world. Duffy and Chase () show that varying labor rates from $4/hour to $50/hour significantly changed the profitability of conservation tillage systems relative to conventional systems.

Because of the tillage-related labor savings associated with conservation tillage, net returns improved for conservation tillage as labor costs increased. Type: Book Chapters Status: Accepted Year Published: Citation: A.

Book Chapters: 26 Title: Conservation tillage systems for the Eastern Blackland Prairie (Mississippi and Alabama). Authors: Charles Mitchell and Normie Buehring. Book title: Conservation Tillage Systems: Production, Profitability and Stewardship.

Past projections of conservation tillage adoption are briefly reviewed. Also discussed is the definition used by the US Department of Agriculture in its projection and how the definition has. Under adequate water regimes, conventional tillage resulted in greater yields at low levels of nitrogen, but maximum yields occurred regardless of tillage system, when kg ha-1 were applied.

Conventionally-tilled maize generally resulted in higher yields than conservation tillage production. A wide and deep distribution of the maize root system is required for optimal yield [25,26]. In a recent study, maize roots showed horizontal contraction and vertical extension, and the root systems in the deep soil layers significantly increased [27].Cited by: Conservation tillage practices tend to increase the tortuosity of surface runoff path and increase infiltration time.

Conservation tillage systems dominate regions of the country where farming is practiced on sloping lands, soil texture is conducive to crusting and erosive rains are frequent during soil preparation for planting. Tillage systems are often classified by the amount of surface residue left on the soil surface.

Conservation tillage systems leave more than 30% of the soil surface covered with crop residue. This amount of surface residue cover is considered to be at a level where erosion is significantly reduced (see figure ).

Of course, this residue. The complementary interaction between topsoil depth and technical progress for winter wheat in the Palouse region was found to strengthen the long run payoff to conservation tillage. Nonetheless, conservation tillage was found to be competitive with conventional tillage only if its current yield disadvantages were eliminated.

Conservation tillage was relatively more competitive on shallower Author: Daniel B. Taylor and Douglas L. Young. Results from a year study, initiated on a fine sandy loam (Orthic Podzol) in Prince Edward Island (eastern Canada), were evaluated to assess the use of conservation tillage (CT), compared to.

Conservation Tillage - Equipment 1 About This Presentation This Power Point presentation was prepared by Dave Lightle Conservation Agronomist at the Lincoln, Soil Lab as part of the Core 4 Initiative.

It has nation wide applicability. Dave is instrumental in developing RUSLE databases. Recent increases in diesel price and decreases in glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine] price should favor the profitability and farmer acceptance of herbicide-intensive conservation tillage systems versus fuel-intensive traditional tillage (TT) ability results from a long-term field experiment that compared TT, minimum tillage (MT), and delayed minimum tillage (DMT) systems Cited by: The year study was conducted in southern Illinois (USA) on land similar to that being removed from Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) to evaluate the effects of conservation tillage systems on: (1) amount and rates of soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and retention, (2) the long-term corn and soybean yields, and (3) maintenance and restoration of soil productivity of previously eroded by: An Economic Analysis of the Potential for Carbon Credits to Improve Profitability of Conservation Tillage Systems Across Washington State Chapter 24 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest.

No-tilling slopes as steep as 60% that receive as little as 12 inches of annual moisture and summer-time temperatures that frequently run over degrees F., John Aeschliman has been successfully no-tilling in the Palouse area of eastern Washington for more than 40 years.

Saxton points out that this amount of soil loss and more has occurred through years of water erosion and tillage erosion on a substantial portion of the Palouse and other Northwest cropland areas. Furthermore, yield potentials have declined on these eroded soils, due in part to the lower soil water storage.

In general, the corn grain yields were similar across all three tillage treatments in moist years when yields were above 6, kg/ha (95 bu/ac). However, in and when yields were reduced by severe July and August droughts, conventional tillage substantially outperformed conservation tillage (Fig.

Although conservation tillage summer fallow can reduce wind erosion markedly, relatively few farmers in the low-precipitation (less than 12 inch/year) region of the Inland Pacific Northwest use it because of investment requirements for conservation tillage machinery and reluctance to change “tried and proven” traditional tillage methods.

Conservation agriculture involves reduced tillage, permanent soil cover and crop rotations to enhance soil fertility and to supply food from a dwindling land resource. Recently, conservation agriculture has been promoted in Southern Africa, mainly for maize-based farming systems.

However, maize yields under rain-fed conditions are often variable. There is therefore a Cited by: Conservation agriculture, based on no-till, the permanent cover of soil surface by crops and their harvest residues and crop rotation, is an efficient system to protect the soil against erosion and to improve SOM (Lal, ).Conservation agriculture has already contributed to the sustainable intensification of agriculture in several developed and developing regions of the world by improving.Residue management, primarily through reduced tillage and no-till systems, is the first defense against both wind and water erosion, but yields often are higher with conventional intensive ti llage.

Factors that limit yields with conservation farming include weed and disease problems and th e lack of suitable tillage and seeding by: